London Science Museum

Yesterday was a trip to the science museum, my goal for the trip was to view how people interacted with interactive installations and how the installations attract people to it. While viewing people at the installations i noticed a big difference between how people interacted with installations, depending on their age. While viewing the area, a group of school children, age range between 8 to 12, entered the space. they were immediately drawn to the metal pole that had a ‘do not touch’ sign displayed around it. The kids seemed to ignore the sign and touch the pole anyway. Adults were much more cautious to touch the pole and just watched or ignored it. This showed to me that a do not touch sign means nothing to kids and that they want to do what they can’t do. Once the children were bored of this, a few of them went to a game installation which had a big button and a joy stick. Kids seemed to ignore the information on the screen and wanted to skip this part and play the game straight away, they bashed on the button and got annoyed when it didn’t do anything and yanked on the joy stick. Young adults and teenagers seemed to take more time to read the instructions to understand the game.

When I left the museum, and walked past a bus shelter, i noticed it had an interactive advertisement which was for contact lenses. The advert had a person behind the screen that would notice you and try to coax you over with hand signals. The aim was to have a staring contest with the person behind the screen. To start it, you need to touch the screen and then not look away from the person otherwise you lose. When you lose the advert prints out a voucher for free contact lenses. If you win you got the choice to have the voucher or not.

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